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Posts Tagged sick hen

Tulip is Back With Flock

17 June 2011

Tulip enjoys a dust bath.

Tulip is soooooo much better. We’ve put her back with her flock for a few hours each day. Today she laid her first egg since her injuries last week.

The first day that we put her in with the other hens, I waited to see if they began pecking her back. It still has a bare spot but there is no blood present. I didn’t see them peck her at all. She rushed over to a private spot that the cameras don’t show, layed down and took her first dust bath in four days. I’m sure she felt like we all do when we’ve been deprived of a shower for a few days. She spent an hour fluffing her feathers and rolling about in the dirt. After a while, Poppy joined her. Poppy just sat near her, glad to have her back.

I’m not sure who started the pecking but my suspicion was that it was Petunia. Petunia has always been a bit of a pecker. I’ve made a rather tough decision in the last week. I’ve have been looking for a better home for Petunia. One with a larger run; perhaps a “free range” situation. A rooster would be good. Roosters seem to know how to handle ill-tempered hens. I believe that I have found a good home for Petunia and will post about it when I deliver her there.

Poppy visits with Tulip as she takes her dust bath.

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Ameraucana Hen Doing Well

13 June 2011

"Queen Tulip" Sitting on Don's Lap

Thought you’d like to know that Tulip is doing well in her cage in the garden shed. She was so depressed when she was being picked on in the chicken run, I was afraid she was just going to lie down and give up. Now she is talking to me when I go visit her and enjoying her regular feed, yogurt, and tuna (supposed to help her grow her feathers back).

Tulip (I call her “Queen Tulip” because she is so regal looking) is so much a part of our flock. I’d hate to lose her. She’s a bit aloof; not the first to jump on our laps. But when her feet are cold, she’s right there. I like her because she’s mellow and calm most of the time. Not typical of chickens. She seldom is noisy unless she lays one of her big, beautiful, light green eggs. Then she is the first to let us know (with Sweetpea cheering her on). It can be quite a chorus at times.

Hopefully, Tulip will be back in the run in no time. Thanks for your good wishes.

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Daisy is Ill-Egg Broke Inside Her

3 August 2010

Daisy is Soaking in the Laundry Tub

Daisy had an egg break inside her and it has made her sick. It is hard to know what exactly caused this. Something has gone wrong with her “egg-making machine”. She was always a good layer. She was the first of our flock to begin laying eggs at 5 months.

Last week I found her with her head drooping down facing the corner. She didn’t eat or drink but was able to join the others on the roost inside in the evening. This went on for another day. On the second day we turned her upside down. A piece of what looked liked plastic was sticking out of her vent. I pulled on it gently but it caused her discomfort. I took a picture of it (yes, folks, I did) and posted a question on the Backyard Chicken Forum, “First Emergency: What is this sticking out of my hen, and what do I do about it?” You can see the post with all the graphic pictures by going the Backyard Chickens forum and search the topic. You’ll see that it is a common problem and causes much illness and death in hens.

Backyard Chickens is a website with nearly 50,000 members (including me). Members can post questions and answers. Everything I’ve learned about chickens, I learned on this site. Kind of like, “Chicken lovers helping chicken lovers”. They were quick to advise me and give me support.

Turned out that daisy had an unformed egg break inside her. What I saw was the membrane inside a broken egg that had dried and gotten stuck. We would need to soften the membrane and get it out. Daisy tolerated mineral oil being put in her vent (where the egg comes out). I’ll leave it to your imagination as to how we did that. She tolerated soaking in a laundry tub full of warm water. She tolerated have the membrane pulled from her body. She tolerated being dried with a hair dryer. And, finally, she rather enjoyed sitting in a cage in the laundry room, under a heat lamp, warming herself.

As the sun began to set, Daisy wanted to rejoin her flock. We put her in with her sisters and she went off to roost. Hopefully, she will recover. I’m hesitant to be too hopeful. When things go wrong with the “egg-maker” it is often a chronic condition. We’re keeping a close eye on her. Daisy is a sweet, sweet, hen. I would hate to lose her.